British Isles
London Transportation
Juliette Low
English Literature
American History in London
Central London Trading Patch
Summary Sheet
Patch Descriptions
Girl Scout Home

The purpose of the British Isles patch is to explore and locate on a map some of the wonderful and interesting places in the British Isles where we can visit or live. The British Isles are composed of several geographical and historical areas: Wales, Scotland, Channel Islands, Jersey Islands, England, Republic of Ireland, Northern Ireland. All have interesting histories and are fun places to visit or live in.

Suggested Activities:

  1. Read General Description of Patches and How Patches May Be Worn on the Patch Descriptions page. .
  2. Put together a photo, postcard, and/or brochure album or scrapbook of the places you have visited or lived and share this with your Troop as you discuss the following activities. Or do a videotape or oral tape recording.
  3. Draw a map of the British Isles and locate the areas listed in the introduction. Put a star or a dot on the places you have visited or lived while working on this patch.
  4. Write a paragraph for each of the areas listed below. Daisy and Brownie Girl Scouts: You can either draw a picture or write a description, or you can dictate to one of your parents or family or friend, who can write your paragraph down for you.
  5. For England:
    • Select two small towns or historical locations or scenic places out in the country in England. Describe why you enjoyed visiting or living in these places.
    • Also select one city in England and describe why you enjoyed visiting or living in this location.
  6. For Wales, Scotland, Northern Ireland, the Republic of Ireland, the Channel Islands and the Jersey Islands:
    • Select two of these areas. For each area write a paragraph describing why you enjoyed visiting or living in these areas.
  7. When all the activities have been completed, including the sharing with your troop, submit the patch application form through your Girl Scout Leader who will send it to the Central London Neighborhood.

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The purpose of the transportation patch is to highlight the distinctive modes of transportation in London, England and to encourage visitors and local Girl Scouts to use a variety of the transportation modes when in the London area. London Black Cabs, Double Decker Busses, and Underground Tube Lines are known throughout the world for their distinctive look. In addition, they are fun to ride in when traveling or sightseeing. (The London Transport Museum can provide more details and is fun to visit.) The British Rail intercity Trains are an easy way to travel when sightseeing in England, Scotland and Wales. The Euro-Star trains, to and from the Continent, run under the English Channel and are a new and exciting way to travel. There also are ferries on the Thames River and boats, which tour on the canals through London.

Suggested Activities:

  1. Read General Description of Patches and How Patch May Be Worn on the Patch Descriptions.
  2. Ride three (3) of the following modes of Transportation. Write a short paragraph (for Junior, Cadette, and Senior Girl Scouts) telling which one you liked best and why. Daisy and Brownie Girl Scouts: You can either write your own paragraph or have an adult write your ideas down or you can draw a picture of which mode of transpiration you liked best.
    • London red double decker bus
    • The Euro-Star train.
    • One of The Underground or Tube lines.
    • A Thames ferry.
    • One of the British Rail or intercity trains.
    • A canal boat.
    • London Black Cab (though they now come in many different colors and two new shapes also).
  3. You may also want to put together a photo, postcard, and/or brochure album or scrapbook or do a videotape or oral tape of the different types of transportation you rode on.
  4. Share your paragraph (and your optional album if you made one) with your Troop.
  5. When all the activities have been completed, including the presentation to your troop, submit the patch application form through your Girl Scout Leader who will send it to the Central London Neighborhood.

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In 1997 the Central London Neighborhood, United Kingdom assumed administration of The Juliette Low patch, but full recognition must be given to the Edzell Neighborhood from Scotland, who developed and initiated this patch several years ago. When the US Base closed in 1996, Central London Neighborhood made a request to NORAGS to administer this patch. Introduction and Purpose of Patch: To read about Juliette "Daisy" Low, the founder of Girl Scouts USA and to explore Scotland, where she formed the first troop of Girl Guides. The girls wove cloth, raised chickens and made candles to help their families. Juliette then returned to her hometown of Savannah, Georgia and formed Girl Scouts USA. You can use the G.S. books and reference books to learn about Juliette Low.

Suggested Activities:

  1. Read General Description of Patches and How Patch May Be Worn on the Patch Descriptions.
  2. Put together a photo, postcard and/or brochure album or scrapbook of places you visit or lived and share this with your Troop as you discuss the following activities. You could also make videotape or an oral tape recorder presentation.
    • Visit a major city in Scotland (i.e. Edinburgh, Glasgow, Aberdeen) and while there visit a local castle or historical landmark. Observe the people, buildings and history of the area.
    • Visit a small village in Scotland, away from the city lights. While there visit another castle or historical landmark. Observe the people, buildings and history of the area.
    • Discuss with your Troop what you learned and how the two areas of Scotland are the same and how they are alike. What was Scotland like years ago and how has it changed through history?
  3. Read and learn about Juliette Low. Write the answers to these questions and submit them to your Troop Leader, but do not share this information with the other girls in the Troop. This is information they should research themselves.
    • What is important about these two dates: October 31, 1860 and March 12, 1912?
    • Each Year Girl Scouts USA celebrates these two dates: February 22 and April 22. Why are they important?
    • What was the name of the first Girl Scout Troop? (Hint: same as Juliette's nickname.)
    • In what town was Juliette Low born and where did she die?
    • What did Juliette Low do in Scotland?
  4. When all the activities have been completed, including the presentation to your troop, submit the patch application form through your Girl Scout Leader who will send it to the Central London Neighborhood.

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The purpose of the Children's English Literature and Nursery Rhymes patch is to read and explore the locations and settings for some of the common children's nursery rhymes and stories which were set in England, particularly within a day trip of London vicinity.
Suggested Activities:
  1. Read General Description of Patches and How Patch May Be Worn on the Patch Description page.
  2. Put together a photo, postcard and/or brochure album or scrapbook of places you visited or lived and share this with your Troop as you discuss the following activities. You could also make a videotape or do an oral tape recorder presentation.
  3. For Daisy and Brownie Girl Scouts select three (3) sites or locations listed below. Junior, Cadette, and Senior Girl Scouts select five (5) sites or locations listed below. Read books or stories or watch a movie that relates to these locations. Visit the sites or locations. In addition to the list below, you may also identify other sites, which relate to nursery rhymes or children's English literature. If you do select a new site, please send its name and location to the Central London Neighborhood so we can add it to improve our patch project.
    • Using a nursery rhyme or Mother Goose book and a map, locate sites such as The London Bridge (nursery rhyme) over the Thames River near King William Street, the town of St. Ives, etc. Visit some of the sites. Lavenham, Suffolk is where Twinkle Twinkle Little Star was written. Bad Stone Hill in Kilmersdon, Somerset is the setting for the nursery rhyme Jack and Jill Went Up the Hill.
    • The Jane Austin House in Chawton, near Winchester, Hampshire commemorates the author of Pride and Prejudice, Emma, Sense and Sensibility and other books. Call for a tour.
    • Thomas the Tank Engine and the idea of train engines talking to one another were conceived by the Rev. Wilbert Vere Awdry. As a child he lived in Box in Wiltshire where he heard and saw the trains on the Great Western Railway line, between Paddington and Bristol, go by. He wrote over 25 books and his son Christopher continues the tradition and has written over ten books in the Railway Series.
    • The Peter Pan statue is in Hyde Park, London. The Kensington area of London is where the Darling family home was placed. Hampstead, London is where the idea of "lost boys" came from, based on a family of boys whose parents had died. Sir James Barrie lived on Campden Hill Square near Holland Park, London or visit Kirriemuir, Scotland, his birthplace.
    • For those interested in the Bloomsbury Group (Virginia Woolfe, Lytton Strachey, etc.) a walking tour of the Bloomsbury area of central London may be interesting. In Charlston, East Sussex is the Charlston Farmhouse filled with vibrant painted murals, pictures and furniture and an interesting garden.
    • In Haworth, West Yorkshire, is the Bronte Parsonage filled with mementos of Emily, Charlotte and other family members. But the stories of Wuthering Heights, Jane Eyre, etc. will become more alive by touring or walking the surrounding countryside on trails such as the Bronte Way.
    • The South Strathclyde area of southern Scotland is Robert Burns's country, the author of Auld Lang Syne and many other poems. Follow the Burns Heritage Trail to places such as Burns Cottage and Museum and the nearby Land o-Burns Visitor Center in Alloway. In Edinburgh is the Lady Stair's House, which houses memorabilia of authors Robert Burns and Robert Lewis Stevenson plus Sir Walter Scott.
    • There is an Alice in Wonderland Visitor's Center is Llandudno, North Wales. This is where Lewis Carroll spent the summer with the Liddell family whose daughter was the model for Alice. Lewis Carroll lived in Guildford, Surrey. There are two memorials and his house on Castle Hill has a memorial plaque on it.
    • In Aylesbury, Buckinghamshire, at the County Museum is the new Roald Dahl Museum, a fun filled science, and hands-on museum based on the activities described in his books.
    • In Canterbury there is a Chaucer Canterbury Tales Heritage Center, plus the Cathedral is very interesting.
    • Charles Dickens was the author of A Christmas Carol, Tale of Two Cities, David Copperfield and many other well-known books. See his house at 49 Doughty Street near the Russell Square tube stop in London and go on a Dickens London walking tour. Another Dickens' home is in Broadstairs, Kent. His birthplace is at 393 Old Commercial Road in Portsmouth, Hampshire.
    • The Yorkshire Dales region is well know to readers of the James Herriot's All Creatures Great and Small books and television series.
    • Keats home in Hampstead is where John Keats wrote many of his poems.
    • Rudyard Kipling's Jungle Book, Just So Stories, Kim, Riki-Tiki-Tavi and many other stories are based in India, but his home Bateman's is in Burwash, East Sussex where he lived for 34 years.
    • C. S. Lewis who wrote The Cronicles of Narnia series, Screwtape Letters and many other books was an Oxford don. For older Girl Scouts the town of Oxford is very interesting, since many authors and historical persons are associated with one or more of the many Oxford colleges.
    • The Admiral's House on Admirals Walk in Hampstead, London is where there really lived an Admiral who fired off a cannon as described in Mary Poppins. Regents Park is where the children's adventures occurred. The steps of St. Paul are where the old woman fed the pigeons. And the London City roofscape is where the children's chimney sweep adventures occurred.
    • Winnie the Pooh and the Hundred Acre Woods books are set in the Ashdown Forest (off of the B2026 about 2 1/2 miles from Hartfield in Sussex), which both the illustrator E.H. Shepard and the author A.A. Milne knew well. There are two statues of Winnie the Pooh in the London Zoo, and AA Milne took the name Winnie from a real Canadian bear that lived in the zoo for 30 years.
    • On Paternoster Row near St. Pauls Church, in the City of London, there is a plaque to John Newbery, (1713-67) for whom the Newbery Children's Book award is named for. He was the publisher of Mother Goose Tales. Plus he owned a bookstore and initiated the first children's library in London from number 65 St. Paul's Churchyard Street, a building that no longer exists.
    • Read the Paddington Bear books and find the London areas he tells about visiting.
    • The Beatrix Potter Gallery in Hawkshead, in the Lake District has collections of her original drawings and her Hill Top Farm still has the little country house and gardens where she wrote many of her Peter Rabbit and other animal stories. In Birnam, Scotland is the childhood garden she visited in the summer.
    • In the Harry Potter books, Harry catches the train to Hogwarts School from Platform 9 ¾ at Kings Cross Station. The author, Ms. J. K. Rowling is from Edinburgh.
    • Nottinghamshire, in the North Midlands was home to Nottingham Castle, now demolished, but the Castle Museum does have a history of Nottingham and nearby Sherwood Forest County Park is all that is left of Robin Hood's forest.
    • The new replica of the Globe Theater may be interesting to Middle School and High School Girl Scouts who have read Shakespeare. In Stratford upon Avon, in Warwickshire visit Anne Hathaway's cottage, Mary Arden (his mother's) cottage and the Shakespeare Countryside Museum.
    • There is a Sherlock Holmes exhibit on Baker Street in London. A sculpture of the Sir Arthur Conan Doyle is outside of the Baker Street tube stop.
    • Robert Lewis Stevenson wrote Treasure Island when he lived in Unst, on the Shetland Islands. Another house where he lived is in Hampstead, London and is at the top of the hill off of Holly Walk. This house, the Mary Poppins Admiral's house, and several other author's homes are on London walking tours.
    • Enid Blyton, Sue Townstead, and Brian Jacques are examples of authors who have set many of the scenes in their books in England. You may know of other authors who have done the same.
  4. Find the locations on a map.
  5. Write a paragraph about how the actual locations or sites were the same or different from what you expected.
    • Remember that authors often use their imagination to create a "new world" for their story or poem. They may use the names of certain places or streets or towns or bridges as a setting for their literature. Movie makers will do the same thing. They may film a building or a street, but it may or may not be where the story took place. However, that location is similar to how they pictured the story or poem or event in their mind. Sculptors create a statue of how they imagine in their mind what an event or person looked like. These locations may be completely different from the "world you created in your imagination" when you read the story, the poem, or saw the movie. Also remember that illustrators and book artists use their imagination to create "new worlds" too.
    • Think about these ideas when you write your paragraph of how the locations were the same or different from what you expected. (For Daisy and Brownie Girl Scouts, you can either write a description or you can dictate to someone who can write down your paragraph.)
    • Tips to help you: The British Museum has an Old Manuscripts Room that is an interesting place to visit. Also, many libraries have a copy of the Blue Plaque Guide, which identifies the locations where well-known people, including authors lived and worked.
  6. When all the activities have been completed, including sharing with your troop, submit the patch application form through your Girl Scout Leader who will send it to the Central London Neighborhood Girl Scouts. If you selected authors or sites other than those we have listed, will you please send their names and locations to us? We will use your ideas to improve our patch project. Thank you.

Thanks are extended to Sherry Nelson, Middle School Librarian and Frances Hall, Lower School Librarian, both at The American School in London and to the Walter Hines Page Chapter, National Society Daughters of the American Revolution.


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The purpose of the American History in Greater London patch is to read about and explore locations which have a connection to American History and which are located in England, particularly within a day trip of London.

Suggested Activities:

  1. Read General Description of Patches and How Patch May Be Worn on the Patch Description page.
  2. Put together a photo, postcard and/or brochure album or scrapbooks of places you visit or lived and share this with your Troop as you discuss the following activities. You can do a videotape or an oral tape recorder presentation.
  3. If you are an American Citizen learn The Pledge of Allegiance. Learn two patriotic songs such as The Star Spangled Banner, America, My Country Tis of Thee, America the Beautiful, God Bless America or This Land is Your Land. (See lyrics).
  4. For Daisy and Brownie Girl Scouts, select three (3) sites or locations listed below. Cadette, Junior, and Senior Girl Scouts select four (4) sites or locations listed below. Read about these historic areas or watch a movie that relates to these locations. Visit the sites or locations. In addition to the list below, you may also identify other sites that have a connection to American History. If you do select a new site, please send its name and location to the Central London Neighborhood so we can add it to improve our patch program.
    • Locate and walk past the United States Embassy in Grosvenor Square and the Ambassador's Residence Winfield House on the north edge of Regents Park. There are a number of statues and commemoratives in the Grosvenor Square area. (See a sample of a walking tour of the area.)
    • Also in Grosvenor Square are statues of Franklin D. Roosevelt and Dwight Eisenhower. George Washington's statue is in Trafalgar Square, and Abraham Lincoln's statue is across the square from Big Ben in Parliament Square. John F. Kennedy's is on Marylebone Road, several blocks east of Baker Street.
    • Abigail and John Adams, second President of the United States, lived in the house at 9 Grosvenor Square. He negotiated the Peace Treaty that ended the American Revolutionary War and was the first Ambassador to England from the new United States.
    • All Hallows by the Tower Church near the Tower of London is where William Penn was baptized. The state of Pennsylvania was named for his family. John Quincy Adams, sixth President of the United States was married here.
    • The tea, which ended up in Boston Harbor during the Boston Tea Party in 1173, was loaded onto the ships near Sugar Baker Court at the Thames River.
    • Benjamin Franklin lived at 36 Craven Street, which is behind the Charing Cross Tube stop, from 1757-1762 and again in 1765-1775. The Benjamin Franklin Society is currently trying to raise funds to open the house to the public.
    • Sulgrave Manor, near Banbury, Oxfordshire is the ancestral home of George Washington's family. The Washington coat of arms had Stars and Stripes on it. Another home of Washington's ancestors is Washington Old Hall, near Sutherland, Newcastle-upon-Tyne, Northumberland.
    • The American Museum in Britain is located at Claverton Manor, Claverton Down, near Bath. One interesting feature is a garden that duplicates General George Washington's garden at Mount Vernon in Virginia based on correspondence Washington had with the residents of the manor.
    • In Dumfries, Scotland is the John Paul Jones Museum, commemorating this naval hero of the Revolutionary War.
    • Buried in St. Martin-in-the-Fields Church on Trafalgar Square are Queen Kamamalu and King Kamehameha II of Hawaii, who died of measles on a state visit to London in 1824.
    • Visit one of the American Army or Air Force Bases such as Lakenheath near Cambridge, or Alconbury or Molesworth or the West Ruslip Base west of London. Many of the airfields and military bases in England played a very important role in WWII. Visit any of them. (You will need military clearance to enter military bases, so make pre-arrangements.) The airfield, now called the Aircraft Museum in Duxford, played a crucial role in the WW II Battle of Britain. It is just south of Cambridge and has the largest collection of historic aircraft in Europe. It is a very interesting trip for all family members.
    • The Brookwood Cemetery in Woking, Surrey, has a section commemorating American World War I veterans.
    • There are statues of Sir Winston Churchill and President Franklin D. Roosevelt sitting on a bench on New Bond Street, London.
    • St. Paul's Church has several connections to American History. One of these is a statue to General Cornwallis, who surrendered to General Washington at Yorktown, but his statue is only inscribed as a Governor of India. There are many other memorials and statutes in the crypt and in the church. The largest is the American Memorial Chapel on the right side, in back of the center altar. It is a tribute to the 28,000 Americans, based in Britain, who died during World War II. There are colorful badges from each state, plus wood carvings of American birds, plants, and animals, which are fun to find and name.
    • Each year on Thanksgiving Day in November a service is held at St. Pauls for London's American community. You may have the opportunity to attend this church service.
    • Westminster Abbey has many memorials with American connections, but near the west door are two of interest. A plaque on the wall surrounded by an American eagle honors World War II President, Franklin D. Roosevelt and close by on the floor is a tablet honoring Winston Churchill, Prime Minster of England during World War II. Churchill's mother Jennie was an American from New York and was one quarter Iroquois Indian. There are many memorials to American servicemen, statesmen, poets, explorers, scientists,and other noteworthy Americans in the Abbey.
    • Buckland Abby, 11 miles from Plymouth, west of the A386, near Milton Combe village was the estate of Sir Francis Drake who landed in California and established an English colony in 1579.
    • Henry Hudson is commemorated in three stained glass windows at St. Ethelburga-the-Virgin in the Bishopgate area at the end of Threadneedle Street, London. He explored the Hudson River in New York State, and Hudson Bay in Canada is named for him.
    • In the Tower of London is a display of Sir Walter Raleigh's living quarters. Drawings and paintings are by John White, one of the 1585 Roanoke, Virginia settlers. Sir Walter Raleigh is buried in and a stained glass window commemorates him in St. Margaret's Church, which is next to Westminster Abby.
    • St. Brides Church on Fleet Street was the family church of John White who published many drawings of America. There is a small carving on the backside wall of his granddaughter, Virginia Dare who was the first European recorded to be born in America. St. Brides was a Pilgrim Church.
    • Pocahontas, the American Indian Princess who married John Rolfe, died on her way back to America, in March of 1617, after visiting London, She is buried in the chancel of old St. George's Church, Gravesend, Ramsgate, Kent on the Thames River. The parish register lists her as Rebecca Wrolfe. She was known as "Lady Rebecca" in London.
    • In 1606 three ships sailed to Virginia and founded Jamestown. A stained glass window in St. Sepulche in Newgate pictures the Discovery, Susan Constant and Godspeed ships. Near that same window is the tomb of Captain John Smith who was saved by Princess Pocahontas. A statue of him is outside St. Mary-le-bow Church on Cheapside Street, near St. Sepulche.
    • In Jordon, Berkshire at the Quaker Center is a barn said to be the Mayflower ship which in 1620 the Pilgrims sailed to American in. If you stand inside and look up it does look like the hull of a boat upside down. The Mayflower ship sailed down the Thames River on it's way to America with the Pilgrims. William Penn and his some of his family are buried nearby.
    • Plymouth Harbor has several restored buildings on the waterfront, plus a plaque indicating where the Pilgrims stayed before they left for America. There is a monument nearby. Sir Walter Raleigh also left from this harbor. In Southampton at the Royal Docks is a 50-foot tall monument to the Pilgrim's ship the Mayflower. The old cathedral town area of Canterbury, in Kent, was home to many of the Pilgrims.
    • Runnymede at the A308 and the Thames River, east of Great Windsor Park is where King John signed the Magna Carta in 1215, under threat of force. The United States Constitution is based on the Magna Carta. A memorial to President John Kennedy is up the hill, 50 steps for the 50th President, killed in his 50th year.
  5. Locate some of the sites on a map. Put a star on the locations you visited.
  6. Now select one site which you thought was very interesting and either write a paragraph or have an adult write your ideas down or you can draw a picture of why the site was so interesting to you.
  7. Select a second site and write a paragraph explaining that second site's connection to American History.
  8. When all the activities have been completed, including a presentation to your troop, submit the patch application form through your Girl Scout Leader who will send it to the Central London Neighborhood Girl Scouts. If you selected a site other than the ones we have listed above, please tell us its name and location so we can use it to improve our patch project. Thank you.

Thanks are extended to the London based Walter Hines Page Chapter of the National Society Daughters of the American Revolution and to Ms. Sunny Neutze, Fifth Grade Team Leader, American School in London.

An excellent reference book is London's American Past, by Fran Hazelton, published by Papermac, Macmillan in 1991.


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The Central London Neighborhood Trading Patch is also our Neighborhood Patch. It can be worn by both adults and by girls. It is not an Earned Recognition Patch. It is a patch that sets Central London Neighborhood apart from other Neighborhoods, Lone Troops or Councils. Trading Patches are also "gift patches" to give to friends and family who would hopefully give their Council or Neighborhood Patch back to you.


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Lyrics
The Star Spangled Banner
Oh say can you see, By the dawn's early light What so proudly we hailed at the twilight's last gleaming
 
Whose broad stripes and bright stars, through the perilous fight, O'er the ramparts we watched were so gallantly streaming
 
And the rockets' red glare, the bombs bursting in air gave proof through the night that our flag was still there
Oh, say does that Star Spangled Banner yet wave, O'er the land of the free and the home of the brave.
God Bless America
God bless America, land that I love:
Stand beside her and guide her,

through the night with a light from above,

From the mountains, to the prairies,
To the oceans, white with foam,
God bless America, my home sweet home,
God bless America, my home sweet home.
America the Beautiful
O beautiful, for spacious skies, for amber waves of grain,
for purple mountains majesties above the fruited
plain
America, America, God shed his grace on thee
And crown thy good with brotherhood , from sea
to shining sea.
Oh beautiful for patriot dream that sees beyond
the years
Thine alabaster cites gleam, undimmed by human
tears
America, America, God shed his grace on thee
And crown thy good with brotherhood from sea
to shining sea

 

America
My country 'tis of thee
sweet land of liberty
of thee I sing
Land where my fathers died
Land of the pilgrim's pride
from every mountainside
Let Freedom ring.
 
This Land is Your Land
As I was walking that ribbon of highway
I looked above me, there in the skyway
I looked below me in that golden valley
this land was made for you and me
 
CHORUS
This land is your land; this land is my land
from California to the New York island
From the redwood forest to the Gulf Stream
waters
This land was made for you and me
 
I roamed and rambled, and followed my
footsteps
O'er the sparkling sands of her diamond deserts
And all around me this voice was saying
This land was made for you and me
 
CHORUS
 
I followed your low hills and I followed your cliff
rims
Your marble canyons and sunny bright waters
This voice came calling, as the fog was lifting
This land was made for you and me
 
CHORUS
 
As the sun was a-shining and I was a-strolling
Through the wheat fields waving and the dust a-rolling
I could feel inside me and all around me
This land was made for you and me
 
CHORUS

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American History in London--Grosvenor Square
(This is an example of a walking tour that could be used by your troop--revised for Jan. 2000)
1. Franklin D. Roosevelt's statue is in the middle of the square. Why is he famous?
____________________________________ Read the four inscriptions surrounding this statue.
2. Find the memorial with the eagle on it. What type of servicemen served in this squadron?
________________Where they British or American?__________Try to find last names on the
memorial, which are the same as someone you know.
3. Can you find the commemorative stone unveiled by former Prime Minister John Major marking
the 50th Anniversary of D-Day? What was D-day?__________________________________
4. What is the address of the American Embassy?______________________When was it

SUMMARY SHEET FOR CENTRAL LONDON NEIGHBORHOOD PATCHES
Revised for Jan. 2000 (This is only a summary sheet, refer to patch requirements for more complete details.)
* Daisy and Brownie Girl Scouts
+ Junior, Cadette and Senior Girl Scouts

BRITISH ISLES PATCH

  1. Make a scrapbook, photo, postcard, brochure album or a video. _____
  2. Draw a map of the British Isles and put a dot or star on some of the places you visited or lived in. _____
  3. * Draw a picture, write or dictate a description of the following: + Write a description of the following:
    • For England select two small towns and one city _____
    • For Wales, Scotland, Northern Ireland, Republic of Ireland, Channel Islands, Jersey Island select two of these areas _____
  4. Share with your Troop

LONDON TRANSPORT PATCH

  1. Ride three forms of Transportation. _____
  2. * Draw a picture, write or dictate a description of: + Write a description of: the one which you liked best. _____
  3. Optional to make a scrapbook, photo, postcard, brochure album or a video. _____
  4. Share with your Troop. ____

JULIETTE LOW FIRST TROOP SCOTLAND

  1. Make a scrapbook, photo, postcard, brochure album or a video. _____
  2. * Draw a picture, write or dictate a description of the following: + Write a description of the following: A major city in Scotland and a small town in Scotland _____
  3. Share with your Troop. _____
  4. Answer the questions about Juliette Low. ____

CHILDREN'S LITERATURE AND NURSERY RHYMES PATCH

  1. Make a scrapbook, photo, postcard, brochure album or a video . _____
  2. * Visit three places. + Visit five places. _____
  3. Read books, stories, and nursery rhymes or watch a movie about those places. _____
  4. Find those locations on a map. _____
  5. * Draw a picture, write or dictate a description of how the actual places were different from what you expected. + Write a description of how the actual places were different from what you expected. _____
  6. Share with your Troop. _____

AMERICAN HISTORY IN THE LONDON AREA AND THE UNITED KINGDOM PATCH

  1. Make a scrapbook, photo, postcard, brochure album or a video. _____
  2. * Visit three places. + Visit four places. _____
  3. Find those locations on a map. _____
  4. * Draw a picture, write or dictate a description of how one place was interesting and how another place is connected to American History. _____ + Write a description of how one place was interesting and how another place is connected to American History _____
  5. Share with your Troop. _____ If you are American citizen learn the Pledge of Allegiance and two American Songs. _____

‘Girl Scouts’ and other GIRL SCOUT Trademarks are registered trademarks
of Girl Scouts of the USA and are used herein pursuant to
license.

Last updated December, 2000. Scouting graphics courtesy of